CategoryLegacy Planning

Fighting Over the Family Legacy

I recently read this New York Times article on the family in-fighting over the estate of the late Merton Simpson.   Mr. Simpson was a painter and pioneering champion of African art who accumulated a collection said to be worth millions of dollars.  The story is sad, for sure.  It is also a reminder for all of us of the value of family and of having clearly spelled out wishes to help guide our chosen representatives in carrying on our legacy.  I encourage you to read the entire article – it’s not very long.

It also brings to mind something I always strongly encourage each of my clients to do – talk to others about your planning and what your wishes are for you legacy.  Many times the “others” you talk to will be family or very close friends, but it may also include close business associates, church leaders, or other people who you trust and know you well.  It’s often a great idea to record yourself sharing these thoughts.  That’s what I do with each client I work with – we have a Priceless Conversation.  Sadly, it seems that Mr. Simpson was taken advantage of by at least some of his family and friends.  Although it was a good thing that a guardian was appointed for him, it seems that the downward spiral in family and business relations was almost passed the point of resolution by that point.

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and charitable planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for “stuff” – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate, charitable, and asset protection planning for all generations (“young” and “experienced”), the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses, and pet planning.  He enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients centered on their family’s values, insights, stories and experiences.

Ways to Pass Assets to Your Children

Just last week I ran across this great article about the different ways you can leave assets to your children.   I’m not going to repeat the article here – it’s worth your time to read it, so please do so.  What I will say is this – as a Grand Rapids, Mi estate planning attorney I’ve been somewhat surprised by how many families believe their only choice is to pass their assets at their death to their children.  As the article points out, there are many ways to leave assets to your children and, there is no single right answer for every family.  Remember, estate planning should not be just about what you have, it should also be about who you are.  How you leave your estate to your children is a unique opportunity to share your Whole Family Wealth – who you are and what’s important to you.  This is truly creating a legacy!

There are just two items I want to repeat from the article because they bear repeating (and are items many families don’t think about):

  • “Fair” distributions to your children (or grandchildren) and “equal” distributions are not always the same thing
  • There are many benefits to leaving your assets in trust for your kids’ lifetimes – benefits for them and for you

Have questions?  Give us a call at 616-827-7596 and discover how you can leave a true legacy for your family!

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and charitable planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for “stuff” – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate, charitable, and asset protection planning for all generations (“young” and “experienced”), the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses, and pet planning.  He enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients centered on their family’s values, insights, stories and experiences.

The Value of Family Stories in Your Estate Plan

Most families think of “wealth” as a dollar amount or financial standing.  Yet, the true “wealth” that all of us has is our values, insights, stories and experiences – this is what I call Whole Family Wealth.   Making sure that this “intangible” wealth is part of your estate plan is critical.  Yet, very, very few families take the step to include this true “wealth” in their plan – and, sadly, very, very few attorneys ever think about it.

But it’s beyond important, which is why we include a Priceless Conversation in our planning with each of our client families.  It’s recorded conversation on any number of topics, meant to capture a little bit of who they are and what’s important to them.  I’m very passionate about each client family doing a Priceless Conversation.  And yes, sometimes maybe even a little pushy.  But with good reason – because I’ve made the mistake of missing one and you can read about it in this previous post.  That was the hardest post I’ve written, from an emotional standpoint.

And I was beyond touched to recently read this post by one of my wonderful client families.  I’m not going to reproduce any of it here because it is well worth your time to read it yourself.  Let’s just say that they truly realize the gift they are giving their children through capturing their Whole Family Wealth through Priceless Conversations and, moreso, through their blog.  And don’t forget to read the comments at the bottom of post.  They are powerful and share personal stories of how important this “intangible” wealth is.

Ready to have an estate plan for your Whole Family Wealth not just financial assets?  Call us at 616-827-7596 to schedule a Peace of Mind Planning Session today!

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and charitable planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for “stuff” – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate, charitable, and asset protection planning for all generations (“young” and “experienced”), the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses, and pet planning.  He enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients centered on their family’s values, insights, stories and experiences.

Estate Planning Is For Everyone . . . Including You!

Many Grand Rapids families and families throughout Michigan have the misperception that estate planning is simply preparing for one’s death and is only necessary for the “wealthy.”  The truth is that estate planning is as much about passing values to loved ones as it is about passing material possessions.

So, it should come as no surprise that a February 16, 2012 Forbes article describes estate planning as “the most important love letters you’ll ever write,” encouraging readers to “find inspiration in knowing that you’re caring for the people and causes you love, even if you’re not here anymore.”

The Forbes article correctly concludes that estate planning is for every adult American (including us right here in Grand Rapids, Mi), and that everyone should successfully complete “thoughtfully prepared estate planning documents.” The complexity of those documents may change for more affluent people, but the need to care for loved ones and causes exists for everyone. And working with a qualified Grand Rapids, Mi wills and trusts attorney helps enlighten people as to all they can accomplish through the estate planning process.

I recommend you read the full article, titled The Most Important Love Letters You’ll Ever Write, by clicking here.

And you can read some of my blog posts on similar topics by clicking the links below:

Beware the Double Tragedy in Estate Planning

Family Stories as a Priceless Treasure

Non-Tax Reasons for Estate Planning

Michigan Legacy Planning . . . Not Your Regular Estate Plan

Life Is More Than Money: Leaving a Lasting Legacy

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

Act Now! Two Expiring Charitable Giving Opportunities

As of this writing, there are only 26 days left until two incredible charitable giving carriages turn into pumpkins.  That’s right, December 31, 2011 will bring the expiration of the IRA charitable rollover option and the Michigan Community Foundation tax credit.  Both of these charitable planning options have been responsible for a great amount of charitable giving.  It is my hope that their expiration will not cause a drop off in donations, as charities play an incredibly valuable role in our society and economy.  Here is some more information on both opportunities:

Michigan Community Foundation Tax Credit
This tax credit offers donors making a contribution to a Michigan Community Foundation a maximum credit of $200 on a gift of $400 for couples filing jointly and a maximum credit of $100 on a gift of $200 for single filers.  It also includes the up-to-$5,000 tax credit that businesses can earn for a gift of $10,000.  This is the last year for the tax credit.  It was eliminated to help balance the Michigan budget.

We have so many great opportunities to take advantage of this credit and increase our giving to Michigan Community Foundations.  Where I live in West Michigan we have the Grand Rapids Community Foundation and several of it’s community funds, such as the Southeast Ottawa Community Foundation (of which I’m proud to be a Board member).  These Community Foundations are doing incredible things in communities throughout Michigan for things such as education, arts, the environment, and health.

IRA Charitable Rollover Option
Although this giving opportunity has some restrictions on it, it also provides an opportunity to give a far greater amount and getting a far greater tax benefit for it.  Why?  Because this is a federal income tax benefit and federal taxes tend to be much higher than state taxes – so, each dollar contributed to the charity represents a greater savings to the donor.

The Charitable IRA Rollover was originally scheduled to cease in 2009, but was extended until the end of 2011 by the Tax Act of 2010.  What this means is that any taxpayer age 70.5 or older can make tax-free transfers  of up to $100,000 per year directly from his or her IRA to one or more charities.  These gifts can be made without increasing your taxable income or withholding.

This presents an opportunity for huge savings over the previous method of using IRAs for charitable contributions.  Before this direct rollover option, you would need to first take the distribution from your IRA, which would incur income tax, and then make the charitable contribution, which may have qualified for a charitable deduction on your tax return.  With the direct rollover option you can greatly increase the impact of your giving because it will be the whole amount, not the tax-reduced amount folks previously gave.

There are some additional restrictions and guidelines, so I encourage to read this article on the topic to find out more.

I do hope you will take advantage of the tax benefits before the clock strikes midnight on December 31, 2011!

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

Beware the Double Tragedy in Estate Planning

Last week was National Estate Planning Awareness Week.  An entire week dedicated to raising awareness of the critical importance of estate planning.  It is estimated that over 120 million Americans do not have up to date estate plans.  And according to a recent study, 70% of respondents said that Americans fail to plan because they lack awareness as to why they should.  Even worse, 62% of respondents to the same survey believed that many Americans do not plan because they have the erroneous assumption that estate planning is only for the wealthy.  It certainly is not – read my blog post on the topic here.

So what does that have to do with the double tragedy I refer to in the title?  Even a better question is, what is the double tragedy?  It is this: a dear family member or friend passing away (or you passing away) and a complete lack of an estate plan or a poorly drafted estate plan.  I call it the double tragedy because your family will be dealing with the loss of someone they loved dearly, so why add to their frustration, grief and hardship by leaving them with a mess with your estate due to lack of planning or a “cheapo” estate plan.

Sure, sometimes things go smoothly, but that certainly is not the case in many circumstances.  Why take the chance?  Take the time and money to work with an attorney who focuses on estate planning to help create a comprehensive plan that will show your family how much you cared . . . even after you are no longer here for them.

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

The Critical Importance of Estate Planning for Women

I recently ran across this Forbes.com article about how critically important estate planning is for women.  The article points out how women have been responsible for many accomplishments throughout time and how many of them have become quite successful by any standard.  Yet, even with their increased stature and accomplishment, it seems few have taken the time to do proper estate planning.  The article gives a very interesting statistic comparing weight loss and estate planning . . . you’ll have to read it.

Some of the reasons pointed out in the article for women to do estate planning right now are:

  • Women are more likely to live longer,
  • Married women are more likely to outlive their spouse than are men,
  • “Traditional” estate planning seems to minimize the role of women in the planning, and
  • Your children could very well be lost in the shuffle and end up with caregivers you would not want if something happened to you.

As a Grand Rapids, Mi estate planning lawyer many of my clients have expressed one or more of the above concerns when discussing their planning.  As with most estate planning articles I read, Ms. Jacobs points out the importance of naming guardians in your Will for your minor children.  And like most articles, she stops there.  Well, if you want to help ensure that your children don’t end up in the arms of strangers for any period of time, you need to do much more than just put guardian nominations in your Will.  That’s why all of my clients with minor children have a Children Protection Plan.

And is typical of estate planning articles, the focus is on financial assets.  No matter what your age, children or no children, married or not married, you should look far beyond the financial assets and work with a Michigan estate planning attorney who can help you plan for your Whole Family Wealth – not just what you have but also who you are!  All women have valuable values, insights, stories and experiences that should be shared with family, friends and acquaintances.  And yet, the one thing that is lost when someone passes away – the non-financial assets – is the thing that “traditional” estate planners overlook.

To all the women reading this, please read the article.  Then read it again in light of this blog post.  After reading both, why wouldn’t you “take charge” and move forward with your estate planning?  Your family’s future could very well depend on you!

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

Family Stories as a Priceless Treasure

This post was originally one of my bi-weekly e-newsletters that I send to my clients, friends, family and those who have asked to receive it.  It received an unprecedented response from those who read it and I am grateful for the kind words that were shared with me.  I thought twice before reproducing it here for 2 reasons: (1) I don’t like to reproduce things – I like to be original each time (or as near to original as I can be), and (2) it brought up all the same emotions it did when I first wrote it.  I decided to go ahead and share it because the topic is too important to not share.  Please share your comments and thoughts – and if you would like to receive the e-newsletter, let us know via our contact us page.  Without further ado, we’ll pick up in the e-newsletter as I get into the topic . . .

. . . Even with all the fun and enjoyment of the July 4th holiday, I did receive some very sad news since the last e-newsletter.  My grandpa (“papaw”) passed away after a long bout with cancer.  By God’s grace he made it much longer than the doctors expected, but it still wasn’t enough time for us.  And in the hustle and bustle of family life and running the law practice, I have one big regret.  This is by far the most emotionally challenging e-newsletter I have written, but I’m hoping that you won’t make the same mistake I did.  Which leads to this week’s strategy note . . .

Mike Lichterman’s
“Straight Talk” Personal Strategy
Stories of our Forefathers
Sure, given the recent 4th of July holiday the title could refer to stories of Franklin, Jefferson, Adams and many of the founders of our great country.  In this case, it is a reference to happy and sad, joy and regret, memories and forgotten memories.

This past Christmas, all of my mom’s family gathered together to celebrate (we try to do that every 3 years).  This year was particularly important, as Papaw was not doing so well health wise.  He still seemed to have a lot of strength, but you could never be sure with him because he was such a strong man . . . he wouldn’t show pain because he didn’t want folks to worry about him.  I still remember a few years back when we visited him in Florida and he said, “well, I hope you didn’t come down here to see some sick guy . . . I’m doing just fine . . . and it’s great to have you all down here.”

Little did I know that this past Christmas was the last time I would see or talk to him.  Yes, that was as hard to write as you might expect.  I’m so thankful that we had that time and that he got to spend some time with Matthew and Elizabeth (they loved their Papaw and rode on his knee just like I did when I was growing up).  But OH the things I would have done different had I known it would be the last time.

You probably know about the priceless conversations that I have with all of my clients.  The recorded conversation about any number of topics, from children to legacies, wisdom and values.   I call it planning for your Whole Family Wealth, because your values, insights, stories and experiences or your most valuable asset.  Here comes the hardest part of the email . . . I never did a priceless conversation with my Papaw and it tears my heart out every time I think about it.  He had so many great stories and pearls of wisdom and to have it recorded in his own voice would truly be priceless.

Sure, we talked about doing it at Christmas.  Many of us felt we couldn’t do it because we were too close to the conversation emotionally.  Papaw felt he couldn’t do it because he didn’t think he had anything valuable to share.  Long story short, time moved forward, he went “down hill” quickly, passed away and the conversation was never done.  I’m beyond disappointed in myself for not pushing myself harder to do it.

Sure, maybe I’m being to hard on myself and maybe writing this was a way to grieve and move on, but in my mind the point of sharing the story with you is twofold: (1) did you feel the emotion and the power in the story?  That’s why they need to be shared, and (2) please, please don’t make the same mistake I did.

I expect all my clients to live long, health, joy-filled lives.  But I know that at some point we all will pass from this life.  If I’m alive when it happens to my clients I can assure you that the most valuable thing I will be able to provide their loved ones with is not guidance through a difficult situation, it’s not being a sounding board for grief and frustration, no . . . it will be handing them each a copy of the priceless conversation CDs their parents (or sibling or child) recorded as part of the estate plan we helped them put in place.

I know this was long and probably more personal than you would expect in my e-newsletters, but I wanted to make sure I shared the story and what I learned from it.  I wish you the very best and I hope you have a fantastic week!

Warmly (and until next time!),
Mike Lichterman

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

Non-Tax Reasons for Estate Planning

If you read this previous post, you know that I’ve had several recent conversations with families and other professionals that think estate planning is “dead” due to the increase in the estate tax exemption.  Those conversations have continued, which prompted this follow up post.

It’s true that many families believe that estate planning is all about minimizing taxes and distributing your “assets” to the next generation.  I believe that approach places the emphasis on the wrong considerations.  Sure, minimizing taxes and distributing assets are considerations for estate planning, but without a bigger context they will lead to an estate plan that is not much more than a form document.

The emphasis should be on creating a legacy for your family.  No, that doesn’t mean you have to be a gazillionaire . . . it means that you create your plan in a way that will benefit those you want and do so in a way that shares your values, insights, stories and experiences with them and others.  It can even make them better people (or encourage them to stay a “good person” if they already are).

Think about it this way . . . which of these concerns you more:

  • Your family loses 35% of the value of your estate that is over $5 million (if at all) -or- that 50% of the legacy you pass on to them is lost in a divorce?
  • Your young children (or grandchildren) receive less money for their care -or- that they are cared for by someone you would never want raising them?
  • Your child with special needs is disqualified from government benefits -or- that they never reach their full potential because they are limited to government benefits and limited supplementary services?
  • That there is a tax owed when your family business goes to your children -or- that your children fight over who runs the business or hold a grudge because they didn’t want anything to do with the business and are stuck with it anyway

See the difference?  The focus should be on the personal considerations and the legacy that will be passed on . . . taxes can almost always be handled.

Ready to have a plan that is based on who you are and what’s important to you?  Contact us at 616-827-7596 to schedule your Peace of Mind Planning Session.

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

Having Your Say in Your Michigan Estate Plan

You’ve probably heard about the unique estate planning of Saginaw, MI resident Wellington R. Burt.  If not, you can read an article about it here. Mr. Burt was very well off, under any definition, but that is not what makes his story interesting.  What makes his story interesting is how he used estate planning to accomplish specific goals for reasons important to him.

What did he do?  He made sure that his fortune would bypass his children and grandchildren.  Instead it would be distributed to his living heirs 21 years after the death of his youngest grandchild living at the time that he passed away.

I’ve heard many conversations about this case, both in person and online, many of which are demonizing Mr. Burt for “not caring for his family” or being an “old curmudgeon.”   What many people don’t realize is that estate planning is all about your goals, desires and wishes, not those of others.  And I believe that more families would have unique plans like Mr. Burt’s (ok, maybe not totally skipping 2 generations) if they only knew it was possible.  That’s why it’s important to work with an estate planning attorney who gets to know you, your family, your wishes and desires, and counsels you through various planning approaches based on what’s important to you . . . not what fits in the attorney’s standard form!

Think about it.  Warren Buffett – he has publicly said that his family will receive only a small portion of his estate, the vast majority of which will go to charity.  Bill and Melinda Gates have expressed the same plan.  Sure, even a portion of those estates is a large amount of money, but nowhere near what they could have received.

And this is not uncommon among “normal” folks like you and me.  Why?  Because each family is unique and each plan should match the family in uniqueness.  For example, some parents will “disinherit” a child who is a physician or business owner.  Most folks have a very negative reaction to that . . . but the reason was that the child made enough money and didn’t need any more.  In fact, the child was in favor of being skipped, because a sibling was much more in need.

So maybe your wishes, values and goals don’t call for disinheriting two generations of your family like Mr. Burt’s.  However, I encourage you to think of the sky as the limit, no goal is off the table, when you do your planning.  That way you can have the peace of mind and comfort of knowing you have truly created a lasting legacy.

Oh yeah . . . one more thing.  This story points out an “unsung” benefit of using trusts in your planning.  In large part we know about Mr. Burt’s story because he used a Will.  A Will goes through the probate process and guess what?  That process is public.  By planning with a fully funded living trust (or other types of trusts) you can maintain your family’s privacy.

Wondering how YOUR family can have an estate plan based on who you are and what’s most important to you?  Give us a call at 616-827-7596 to schedule a Peace of Mind Planning Session and find out.  Mention this blog post and we’ll waive the Planning Session fee (a $750 value!)

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses, cottage planning and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.

Asset Protection with Discretionary Trusts

Many Grand Rapids families that I talk with have never considered anything other than giving their assets to their family outright – it could be immediately when they pass away or at some later age.  As a Grand Rapids, Michigan estate planning attorney I consider it my privilege to let them know the downside to that approach and what can be gained by putting some restrictions in their Michigan will or trust.

I came across an excellent example in a recent Michigan Court of Appeals case (read it here).  The basics of the case are this: the beneficiary of the trust had been jailed and the State of Michigan was seeking reimbursement for those costs from the trust.  Guess what?  They couldn’t get to the trust assets!  Why?  Because it was a “discretionary” trust.

What is a discretionary trust?  It is a trust that does not distribute the assets outright, but rather leaves the decisions on what is distributed and when it’s distributed to the discretion of the trustee.  You can find the Michigan Trust Code definition here (MCL 700.7103(d)).  You see, because the “inheritance” is not given outright to the beneficiary and the beneficiary does not have a right to demand that the trustee give him or her any of the trust assets, the trust assets are not considered the beneficiary’s assets.

The best part – even though the trust assets aren’t considered the beneficiary’s assets, the beneficiary can benefit from the trust in the trustee’s discretion as guided by the trust language itself.  Think of it this way . . . by setting up your trust this way you are benefiting your family and at the same time protecting them from creditors, predators, divorce and possibly their own poor spending habits.  Now THAT is truly creating a legacy.

Call us at 616-827-7596 to discover how you can provide these incredible benefits to your family!

Michael Lichterman is an estate planning and business planning attorney who helps families and business owners create a lasting legacy by planning for their Whole Family Wealth™.  This goes beyond merely planning for finances – it’s about who your are and what’s important to you.  He focuses on estate and asset protection planning for  the “experienced” generation, the “sandwich generation” (caring for parents and children), doctors/physicians, nurses, lawyers, dentists, professionals with minor children, family owned businesses and pet planning.  He takes the “counselor” part of attorney and counselor at law very seriously, and enjoys creating life long relationships with his clients – many of which have become great friends.